Britain prepares to face Storm Brian's 70mph winds

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The seafront and a row of fearless spectators in Porthcawl, South Wales, aare seen being engulfed by waves from Storm Brian this morning.

Met Eireann has issued a Status Orange warnings and three Status Yellow warnings due to the incoming storm, and the southern half of the country is now bracing itself again for yet more high winds, and potential torrential rainfall.

Storm Brian is expected to affect much of southern and western England and south and west Wales from early on Saturday morning.

The storm, which could bring gusts of wind of up to 70mph, is likely to hit parts of south-west Ireland in the early hours of Saturday morning.

Also known as explosive cyclogenesis, the weather bomb creates a jet stream of strong winds high up in the atmosphere which interact with the low pressure system.

A yellow Met Office weather warning for wind has already been issued, with strong southwesterly winds expected along the coast - and a "spell of strong winds" is expected in Lowestoft.

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He said: "Environment Agency teams are on the ground, checking defences and taking precautionary action to close tidal gates and put up temporary barriers".

"We urge people to stay safe along the coast and warn against putting yourself in unnecessary danger by taking "storm selfies" or driving through flood water - just 30cm is enough to move your vehicle".

The strong winds will also coincide with high tides "bringing the potential for risky waves", according to Met Office meteorologist Aiden McGivern.

Network Rail along with train operators, has activated its weather contingency plans for some routes and is advising passengers to plan for possible travel disruption.

Drivers were also urged to take extra care on the roads during high winds, as vehicle recovery and insurance firm The AA reminded motorists that surface spray, reduced visibility and potential flooding remained high risks.

Storms in the United Kingdom and Ireland are named alphabetically and Brian will follow September's Storm Aileen.

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